July 2, 2010

Seven Days of Sunset ~ Day 7… Closing Words: Part 1…

Posted in recovery tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 12:14 pm by eddejae

It is hard to believe that just eight months ago, I truly thought my life was over. That there was nothing left for me to live for. That I was worthless, used up, incapable of ever being happy again. After years of struggling with debilitating depression, anxiety, panic attacks, and what I later found out to be Borderline Personality Disorder, I was tired of trying. I was ready to throw in the towel. I was ready to give up the fight. Over a two month period I attempted suicide three times and overdosed on at least five other occasions. I coped with the pain of past and present abuse, trauma, guilt, and self-loathing with binging, purging, cutting, alcohol, drugs, and victimization. In order to survive, I either disassociated from my surroundings or changed my entire personality depending on where I was and who I was with. I didn’t know who I was from one moment to the next. Most people didn’t even know everything that was going on with me, because I was very good at putting on a mask. Life was chaos. Chaos was life.

I failed therapy after therapy. Medications made me even more suicidal. It wasn’t until I was diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder that things started to make sense. However, it still took me a little while to accept my diagnosis and to make the decision to change. It wasn’t until after my third hospitalization that something inside me snapped. I realized that if I didn’t commit to recovery now, I never would, and I would be miserable the rest of my life. It was a decision I had to make on my own. No one… not my family, not my therapist, not anyone… could make it for me. It was a deep, inner choice and true dedication to becoming healthy.

I am convinced that the one deciding factor to my success in recovery was my commitment in that critical and pivotal moment to becoming better.

Without that, nothing would have worked. Not the best therapy in the world, not the most perfect combination of meds, not even the most loving relationship. No…only that commitment that remained even in the most difficult, heart-wrenching moments when those voices screamed at me “Give up! Give up!” …that one small voice of commitment inside that remained, that whispered… “Remember, remember…” That is what made the difference.

My current state of happiness and healing did not happen all at once. It is a result of a lot of hard work, of a long and painful process. Healing, progress, recovery… They are all a result of a series of small, but very important, choices. Really, there is no such thing as a small decision. Every choice you make has vast consequences, no matter how insignificant it may seem at that moment. Remember that when you when you try to get down on yourself when you think you are “failing”… give yourself credit for the tiny successes…. They make more difference than you realize….For it is those seemingly small victories that accumulate and create something magnificent in the end.

Another thing that has greatly helped me in this process has been getting outside myself. The more I reach out to others, the happier I am. The more I isolate myself and retreat inside my own little world, the more depressed I feel. It is hard because I struggle with social anxiety, but just like any other skill, the more you practice, the better you get and the easier it becomes each time. One thing I love to do is bake, especially at night when I can’t sleep. But I don’t just do it for myself, I do it for my friends and family… There’s nothing more fun and rewarding than seeing the joy on someone’s face when you show up at their door with a plate of fresh-baked cookies. Talk about endorphin rush! Believe it or not, it’s little things like that that can really lift you up out of a rut. Try it. Experiment. Can’t hurt, right?

I also had to decide, at a point, to let myself be happy. For most of my life, whenever I started to feel happy, I would immediately begin to feel guilty. For me, I never felt I “deserved” to be happy, because only “perfect” people deserved to be happy. And since I was never perfect, I could never be happy. Took me a very long time, well… my entire life!… to realize that: 1) I am never going to be perfect, and no one is; 2) There is no such thing as “deserving” to be happy; and 3) I can (and should) be imperfect and happy simultaneously. Once I could accept that, emotionally as well as logically (and I still have to work on this daily, as a lifelong habit is hard to break) I was able to do things like enjoy the little things, be in a relationship, and get married (tomorrow!)

Something else I’ve had to learn and work on is boundaries, especially when it comes to helping other people at the expense of neglecting myself. I’ve always had a bit of a “savior” complex, partly out of a genuine compassion for others, but also as a result of low self-esteem. I need to love, but also be loved, as much of my self-validation comes from others’ approval. As a result, I tend to give everything I have to others, whether they deserve it or not, and am often left empty. I give others validation instead of encouraging them to validate themselves.

Over just the last couple of months, I have learned (the hard way), that unless I am taking care of myself first, I am not good to anyone else. I had to learn to step away a bit and focus on my own recovery, otherwise I was at risk of breaking down again myself. One day, when things have settled down and I am comfortable and strong in this new chapter in my life, I will return to helping others in their journey – it is part of who I am and always will be. I love helping others – listening to them, comforting them, being a help and support wherever I can. But I always need to be sure I am in a good place myself first, before I can be a strength to someone else.

The best thing I can offer the world and others is myself – healthy and whole, with a voice that is clear, strong, and true.

April 13, 2010

Resurgam

Posted in recovery tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 10:44 pm by eddejae

“Sometimes it feels good to cry.”

This is what I said to myself last night after a long crying/talking (uh…cralking?) session with my mom. She helped me to identify what has been bringing me down for the last week or so, and suggested that I make more of a conscious effort to talk out all my painful emotions from now on instead of letting them fester. Problem is, I don’t even realize I’m doing it. My therapist pointed this out last week as well. I was doing fine until a binge episode on Thursday that seemed to come out of nowhere. That was the day where I felt I was fighting something all day and losing. She said “I don’t believe in coincidences. SOMETHING happened to trigger that episode. Emotions don’t come out of thin air.” So together we went through everything that had happened the previous few days. I told her what had transpired with my so-called “friend” who decided to” disown” me  for what he perceived as my “abandonment” of our “relationship.” (Sorry, I really can’t talk about this situation without abusing quotation marks. Kind of makes you think it wasn’t real, huh? Huh.)

Anyways, I told her about our whole conversation and how I coped with it. “It didn’t really bother me that much…” She stopped me mid-sentence and gave me one of those “Uh huh, sure” looks and I couldn’t help smirking. Yes, it did bother me. A lot. It hurt. A lot. It made me angry. Very angry. And all the feelings that go with that… abandonment, guilt, loneliness, shame, pain. But, trying to handle things like I believed an “emotionally mature adult” would, I mistakenly shoved it all inside myself without processing. Following my usual pattern, I bottled it up inside until it exploded. This time, the explosion materialized in the form of depression and out of control behavior two days after the event.

I’ve noticed this delayed reaction without my therapist having to point it out to me – most of the time when I experience something painful, I automatically separate myself from my emotions in that moment. It’s like I step outside of myself and witness the experience from a distance as if I were watching a movie. I  shut down emotionally, which makes me feel better in a way.”Wow, I don’t feel anything. I actually feel kind of good!” But the emotional wound has been inflicted whether I admit it to myself or not, and it festers until after one or two days a full-blown infection erupts.

Now that I understand this aspect of my functioning, everything is starting to make sense. I’ve felt myself slipping back into general ennui without fully realizing why. Somehow in the midst of my blubbering and verbal self-flagellation, my mother was able to draw out the silent but deadly triggers that had been building and building, culminating last night’s crisis. I just love it how those little buggers lay low for a few days, lurking beneath the surface, giving subtle cues of their cursed existence until they decide to wage war on my very sense of self and reality. Love it, love it, love it. (Can you sense the sarcasm?)

Anyways, I’m rambling. What was I saying? (Sorry, my attention span is not what it used to be. I blame the meds… *ahem* again.) Oh yes! Ok. So the things that have been getting me down. It’s important I identify them and get them out so I can finally put them to rest.

1. Getting a late-night text from someone I do not want to hear from and has quite the nerve to think they can just contact me whenever they want.

2. Catching a friend’s husband in something that if she knew about, would deeply hurt her OR that she does know about and has simply accepted (which I can’t imagine doing, because if I had a husband and he did something like that I would want to die). I am fiercely protective of my friends, and when someone hurts them, I hurt too. Apparently it’s an aspect of Borderline – I take on others’ emotions. I felt the same pain and shock and subsequent depression just like I would if it had been me in that situation. It was horrible.

3. My dad has been really stressed lately and has been taking it out on my mom. Seeing my mom disrespected and hurt pierces me like a knife. When I was little and my parents would get into arguments and my mom would start crying,  I would hide under the big wooden desk in the office and cover my ears until it was over. Later in life, I would run away. Move out on my own. “Get back” at my dad somehow. Now I just go to my room and write and listen to music really loud. I feel helpless when my mom cries. I hate it. I feel full of rage and compassion at the same time. I’m all grown up now, but at times like that I feel like a little girl again. It’s terribly confusing.

4. My brother has been in a particularly bad mood lately (the typical teenage “I hate my parents” thing). I didn’t realize how much I depended emotionally on him, and with him being angry and distant, I’ve felt a little lost. I mean, he’s one of my best friends and I can always count on him to make me laugh, hang out with me, rock out to music in the car with me, watch weird movies with me, anything. He loves to talk and I love to listen, so we get along incredibly well. So even though I tried not to take his attitude personally, I still felt hurt and abandoned in a way.

5. Ok, this is going to sound extremely childish, but I have to be honest. Lately my mom has been very preoccupied with her online schooling and job hunting. She is absorbed in homework and job applications from early in the morning until late at night. And… even though I’m trying so hard not to act on it or express it in any way… I feel neglected. It’s ridiculous. But my automatic reaction is to feel irritated and to fight for her attention. Seriously, you’d think I was three years old!

So, I think that’s it. Logically, I know they’re little things, but emotionally… they’re huge. I feel everything so deeply, for so long, and I cope with it in such strange ways. I’ve been able to overcome some of the more seriously unhealthy ways of coping, but I still have a lot to work on with my therapist.

Which brings me to another topic: my need for re-commitment to recovery and progress. I have felt my dedication slipping, have seen myself giving into the negative voices, especially the one that says “You’re not worthy.” That voice has been getting louder lately, trying to convince me that I don’t deserve to get better….

“You don’t deserve to be healthy.”

“You’re not worthy of the future and what you hope it will bring.”

“You’re not worthy or deserving of happiness.”

“You don’t deserve to be loved.”

I can’t let them take over. They’re making me forget my goals and everything I’m working for. Things I want so badly, but that somewhere deep inside, I’m starting to give up on. I’m starting to give up on myself again…

BUT I CAN’T. I CAN’T GIVE UP.

This is MY LIFE.

I KNOW WHAT I WANT.

I need to believe I am worthy of happiness. I want to believe it so bad – not just logically, but emotionally. I want the knowledge of my worth to fill me completely.

I will work as hard as I can to get to that point. That is the only way I will have the life I dream of.

So it’s back to my priorities and the of shaping my activities, my short-term goals, my very thoughts to bring me closer to what is most important to me.

And what is that? What are the things I dream of that I cannot give up hope on? That keep me going? That give me a reason to be committed to health, recovery, growth, progress? Those things that give me the courage to go out of my comfort zone, the faith to move mountains, the strength to persevere through it all?

Here they are, once again:

I want to be joyfully married to someone who loves me completely and unconditionally.

I want to give birth to a  beautiful little girl and be the best mother in the world.

I want to get a music degree… just because I can!

I want to be a professional pianist.

I want to write and perform my own music.

I want to teach piano lessons to children.

I want to be a published writer.

I want to have a cute little house with a flower garden.

I want to start a foundation for the promotion of mental health awareness, particularly women’s mental health and personal empowerment.

I want to love and be loved.

I want to express my unique personality in everything I do.

I want to have the courage to always be myself.

I want to be happy.

When I wake in the morning, it will be a rebirth. A new beginning. A re-dedication to everything above.

RESURGAM

… “I shall rise again.”

February 24, 2010

It’s Now or Never

Posted in recovery tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 12:57 pm by eddejae

Today is a brand new day with brand new goals!  I have to say, I’m pretty excited to start the program I’ve created for myself.  The two over-arching goals that I will be constantly working on, even as I master other goals, are:

1) Stick to exercise and nutrition program to achieve weight loss goal and maintain a healthy lifestyle.

  • Start with 30-min cardio/day and work up to 60 min cardio, 5 days a week.
  • Gradually incorporate strength training 2 times a week and stretching every day.
  • Eat 1,200-1,400 calories/day – high protein, complex carbohydrates
  • Cut out any excess sugar and caffeine.
  • Weigh myself once a week to track my progress.

2) Attend weekly therapy sessions and work on applying skills discussed.

  • Journal what is discussed during therapy
  • Identify skills I need to work on and set up a plan of action with therapist

The other three goals I will be working on now are:

3) Daily scripture study and prayer, and weekly church attendance.

4) Reading assigned therapy materials.

  • Read at least a chapter a day in one of the books I’m reading and take notes

5) Practice my piano and singing.

  • Practice piano at least 30 min every day
  • Do some amount of vocal exercises every day

And, of course, blogging every day 🙂

I think my medication is finally starting to take effect… The last few days I’ve had a lot more mental and physical energy than I’ve had in a long time. I’m currently on Seroquel (an anti-psychotic) and Lexapro (anti-depressant). The Seroquel still makes me sleep 11-12 hours a night, but I’m a lot less sleepy during the day. I’ve also noticed less obsessive thoughts and mood swings. My uncontrollable urges to cut myself or overdose have also left almost completely. After trying so many medications that either made me a zombie or made me suicidal, it’s such a relief to finally be on something that seems to be working for me.

I still struggle with urges to binge, but I’m hoping that by sticking to a healthy eating and exercise program, that will decrease as well. Also, since my binging or restricting urges are usually a way for me to escape or distract myself from emotional stress, I’m working on turning to other outlets when I’m feeling triggered. That’s where my 3 goals come in… Practicing my music is a huge emotional release for me, and nourishing my faith and continuing to learn from my therapy books will keep me motivated to choose healthy coping skills.

I will be honest… I’ve never been good at sticking to things or keeping promises to myself. But I know without a doubt that if I don’t stay committed to my goals and to my recovery, I will never have a fulfilling life. It will just be the cycle of depression and self-destructive behaviors, over and over again. I’ve gotten to the point where I can’t accept that anymore. I know what kind of life I want, and I will do whatever it takes to get there. For the first time in my life, I feel truly committed to something. Sure, I may make mistakes … It’s kind of inevitable… But as long as I “fall foward,” and pick myself up again and again, there is no way I can truly fail. I will make it, step by step…

February 20, 2010

“There must be opposition in all things.” Touché.

Posted in recovery tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 8:41 pm by eddejae

I woke up this morning with some very lofty plans for the day. I was going to wake up early, exercise, tidy my room, do laundry, and spend the rest of the day reading, writing, and maybe even getting out of the house a bit. (Doesn’t seem like much, I know… But when your typical day consists of sleeping 12-13 hours a day due to medication and spending the rest of the day in front of the TV because you have no energy or motivation to do anything else…well… Aiming for a normal day of activity feels as daunting as running a marathon!) As luck would have it, I had a restless night and woke up late in the morning with a migraine, sore throat, and cold.

So, instead of having day full of productivity and goal-setting as I had planned, I wound up spending most of my time blowing my nose and sitting in front of the television with my laptop. My natural inclination is to view this as a failure. Yes, I know it’s not my fault I came down with a cold. Yes, I know I shouldn’t push myself when I’m sick. Which is why instead of being hard on myself (perfectionist that I am), I’m going to look at this as just another “fall forward.” I may not have accomplished what I wanted to, but the day was not a total waste. Even if writing this blog entry was the only thing I did today (which… well… it pretty much is haha…), I could still count today as a successful baby step towards recovery.

As it happens, I was able to do a considerable amount of brainstorming while in my somewhat debilitated state. I’ve recognized that a large part of my struggle in moving forward towards healing is my inability over the last few years to set goals and persevere until I reach them. One of the symptoms of BPD is the proclivity towards extremes. I set goals that are unrealistic and then either punish myself when I fail to reach them (example: not letting myself go to a party because I didn’t lose five pounds in one week), or try to attain them in unhealthy ways (such as attempting to lose weight by starving myself). Or, I give up on myself and don’t challenge myself enough. Then I end up stuck in a rut, experiencing no progression or growth.

I think I will continue to use weight as an example, since it is something I struggle with. My “black and white,” extreme thinking has led to serious problems such as anorexia, bulimia, yo-yo dieting, and binging. It is difficult for me to stick to a healthy and reasonable plan of diet and exercise as I tend to slip into “over-doing” it (overly restricting calories or exercising excessively) or giving up entirely (binging). Often this becomes a cycle. Well, I’m tired of it. And I’m not going to do it anymore. My physical health has suffered greatly from what I have put my body through. What I do to myself is related to my issues with low self-esteem, body image, and sexual abuse I experienced as a child. I’ve never liked my body. This is something I am working on in therapy and is probably going to be one of the biggest hurdles I will have to overcome, as it is something very deep-rooted and the behaviors are very ingrained. However, no matter how many times I have tried to break the cycle and failed, I have picked myself up and tried again.

And here I go again. Falling forward. Lately I haven’t been treating my body very well, but that is changing. Starting now. Instead of saying to myself “I have to be this many pounds by this date,” I am simply starting a healthy nutrition and exercise program that I will be able to maintain. I will reach my goal weight whenever I reach it. As long as I am sticking to my plan and avoiding the binge/purge cycle by using the coping skills I am learning in therapy, then I will feel successful every day. The key is not giving up. I CAN do this. I AM strong. Though health and eating issues are not the sole focus of my recovery, I believe that if I can overcome this particular struggle (or at least being able to feel confident in my ability to master it in time), it will give me even further motivation and strength to tackle the other areas of imbalance in my life. Ultimately, everything is connected to each other, and improvement in one area will affect the progress of all the others.

Hopefully tomorrow I will feel better and will actually be able to begin my nutrition and exercise program, as well as do some important reading for therapy. A good night’s sleep will help… So I’m off to bed. Goodnight… Whoever you are. 🙂

February 19, 2010

My Purpose for Writing, Part 2 – A Reason to Go On

Posted in recovery tagged , , , , , , , , , at 7:11 pm by eddejae

Something incredible happened as I lay there in the hospital bed on that pivotal Sunday. I heard a voice inside me say, “There is a reason you are still alive. You have a work to do.” I was overcome with a feeling of deep purpose, a feeling that there is something very important I need to do with my life. I don’t know what that purpose is yet, but I am confident that as I recover and move forward in my life, I will discover what it is that God put me here to do.

Make the most of every failure. Fall forward.

I feel that writing this blog is perhaps a small part of that purpose. If nothing else, it will give me a reason to keep on going. By making a commitment to myself to write each day, to tell the story of my recovery, I am giving myself a reason to get up every morning. A reason to push forward no matter what obstacles lie before me. At this point in the process, the smallest thing is a struggle, and this is a huge undertaking for me. However, I have a feeling that writing this blog, even if no one else in the world reads it, is going to be the most important part of my recovery.

Since that last time at the hospital, I have had many ups and downs. I have had some successes. I have also had failures. But I have realized that as many times as I fail, I pick myself back up again, brush myself off, and move on. Failures are my greatest opportunities to learn more about myself. This blog is itself a result of “falling forward,” and it will continue to be a source of motivation and strength to me as I embark on this journey to discover who I am. Day by endless day, step by stumbling step, I will become just a little more unbroken.